Furrukh Khan has been with LUMS since 2001. He has a PhD in Postcolonial Studies from University of Kent at Canterbury, where he taught for two years prior to coming to LUMS. He has also taught English as a Foreign Language in the UK during the summers. His research interests include the Partition of India, Postcolonial Literature, Shakespeare and Oral History. His publications have appeared among others in Index on Censorship, AngloFiles and The International Journal of Punjab Studies as well as a chapter in The Novels of Bapsi Sidhwa (Edited by R.K. Dhawan and Novy Kapadia) and in Gender, Conflict and Migration (Edited by Navnita Chadha Behera). Furrukh has also published a case study: Empowerment through Representation: Aurat Foundation's Initiative in Local Governance. Managing NGOs in Developing Countries (Volume Three: Gender Challenges). Edited by Dawood Ghaznavi and Bashir Ahmad Khan. Karachi, Oxford University Press, 2006. Furrukh was selected as the South Asia Fellow by Social Science Research Council in 2003. He was hosted by The Center for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi as the ASIA Fellow, funded by a grant from the Asian Scholarship Foundation in 2006. He was selected as the British Academy/ESRC Visiting Fellow from South Asia and the Middle East and affiliated with University of Manchester in 2007. Furrukh has also directed Stories of the Broken Self, a documentary on the Pakistani women's narratives of the 1947 Partition.

Khan, F. (2006). A Critical Stage: The Role of Secular Alternative Theatre in Pakistan. (Book Review). Feminist Review, 84 (1), 149-151.

Khan, F. (1997). The Outer Circles: Women and Children in the Postcolonial Islamic World. Periodica Islamica, 693-704.

Khan, F. (1997). Book Review of Writing India 1757-1990: The Literature of British India, Bart Moore-Gilbert, ed. Contemporary South Asia, 6 (2).

Khan, F. (1997). A Legacy of Violence. Index of Censorship, 6, 81-83.

Khan, F. (1997). Of Victims and Villains: Representation of Muslims in Khushwant Singh's Train to Pakistan and Chaman Nahal's Azadi. Journal of Punjab Studies, 4 (2), 181-200.

Khan, F. (1996). Crossing Imaginary Boundaries: Partition And Temporal Post-Colonial Identities in Bapsi Sidhwa's Ice-Candy-Man. AngloFiles, 99, 21-33.

Khan, F. (2006). Empowerment through Representation: Aurat Foundation's Initiative in Local Governance, Published. Dawood Ghaznavi and Bashir Ahmad Khan (Eds.), Managing NGOs in Developing Countries (Volume Three: Gender Challenges), Oxford University Press.

Khan, F. (2006). Speaking Violence: Pakistani Women's Narratives of Partition, Published. Navnita Chadha Behera (Eds.), Gender, Conflict and Migration, (pp. 97-115), Sage Publications.

Khan, F. & Innes, L. (1996). History of West African Literature, Published. Annotated Bibliography For English Studies, Swets & Zeitlinger.

Khan, F. (1996). The Bride and the Imagined Community, Published. R.K. Dhawan and Novy Kapadia (Eds.), The novels of Bapsi Sidhwa, Prestige Books.

Khan, F. (2012). Confronting the Self and Others: Lessons from the Humanities Curricula in Pakistani Education. 9th Annual Fulbright & Humphrey Alumni Conference, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Khan, F. (2012). Apocalyptic Love Letter: Punjabi Culture, Self-Articulation and Subverting the Dominant Discourse in 'Maula Jatt'. American Institute of Pakistan Studies' What is the Pakistani Public? Conference, Lahore, Pakistan.

Khan, F. (2008). Speaking with the Enemy: Surviving Partition Interviews in India and the United Kingdom. Partition: Reflections Memories Dreams', a conference organized by the Heinrich Boell Foundation, Lahore, Pakistan.

Khan, F. (2004). Forgetting the Remembered Self: Partition and the Ambivalence of Pakistani Identity. The Tenth International Conference of the Association for Literature of Region and Nation,MMU Cheshire, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Khan, F. (2003). When Women Talk: Private Pain, Public Space and Articulation of Critical Memory. 'Politics of Language' conference organized by Simorgh, Lahore, Pakistan.

Khan, F. (2003). Speaking Violence: Pakistani Women's Narratives of Partition. 'Women and Migration in Asia' conference organized by Developing Countries Research Centre, University of New Delhi, New Delhi, India.

Khan, F. (2002). The Threat of 'Savage' Sexuality in The Tempest. Lahore Arts Forum, Lahore, Pakistan.

Khan, F. (2002). The 'Others' Within: Status of Women in Pakistani Ideology. Third South Asian Human Rights and Peace Studies Orientation Course, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Khan, F. (1998). Re-calling Traumas: Memory, Violence and the Oral Narratives of Partition. British Association for South Asian Studies Annual Conference. Uni. Of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Khan, F. (1997). The Violent Constructions: Women and the Postcolonial Predicament in Pakistani Literature. British Association of Pakistan Studies, Lake District, United Kingdom.

Khan, F. (1997). The Enemies Within: Muslim Women in Khushwant Singh's Train to Pakistan. "India: Fifty Years After Independence" conference at University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Khan, F. (1997). Breaking Taboos: The Deconstruction of the 'Sacred' and the 'Profane' in the Urdu Literature of Partition. British Association for South Asian Studies Annual Conference at Bath College of Higher Education, Bath, United Kingdom.

Khan, F. (1997). Breaking Taboos: The Deconstruction of the 'Sacred' and the 'Profane' in the Urdu Literature of Partition. British Association for South Asian Studies Annual Conference at Bath College of Higher Education, Bath, United Kingdom.

Khan, F. (1997). Dis-Locating the 'Other': Migration and Communalism in Indian Novels of Partition. "Communalism & Migration: South Asians in Diaspora" conference at University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland.